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in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
. this is what you do. you get a cross-section. you use certain techniques. thes is no different than surveys in terms of methodologies that the surveys you read all of the time. if it is our true that our survey does not represent the pulte -- the population, then a new survey does either. regarding the question about civil unions, i think that is a very interesting question. many people say i am opposed to marriage. that conveys and means something different. there is a difference between marriage and a civil union. one difference is a very simple one. if you are married, you are in a different tax rate because you are a married couple. if you are in a civil union you are not. ironically, in many cases not being married is a financially beneficial. ironically, by not allowing same-sex couples to get married we are not getting the same taxes from them that we would get. about the 2% vs. the 98%, it has never been a question of what is the largest percentage of people and just benefiting them. the united states has always been concerned about both those with power and those without power. we
book "rules for radicals" is still used as a blueprint for social change. >> it defies all the stereotypes of what a rebel rouser is supposed to be. >> nicholas von hoffman writes about his experiences, tonight on c-span's "q & a". >> this week on "prime ministers questions" members return to the house of commons following their summer recess. and the deputy prime minister stood in. the deputy leader faced questioning about the prime minister's communications chief who was accused of tapping into celebrities' voicemail. he also talks about aid to flood victims in pakistan and unemployment benefits. "prime minister's questions" tonight, 9:00 p.m. eastern, on c-span. now a town hall meeting with senator tom coburn. the oklahoma convenient completing his first term in office sean running for re-election. he takes questions on issues of interests to both local residents and a national audience, mainly on health care. this is just over an hour. >> good afternoon. glad you're all here. what we're going to try to do is spend as much time as we can answering questions. the one thin
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
for americans, and find enough support in this body and the congress. it is very important to us, as a country, that we do not leave those markets to our competitors. >> it would be your opinion that the ratification of those agreements would create jobs? >> we have to make sure that we have agreements in place that provide a good deal for american businesses and american workers. where we have strong agreements that meet that test, it will be important for us to make them law. >> with the basel discussion on the capital standards, i want to ask about capital formation. the financial reform bill changed the net worth test for meeting the accredited investors standard. did you support those changes, believing that altering the standards will impact the ability to raise capital and take companies public? >> you are testing my memory of the origin of that provision. i would be happy to look at it in more detail and come back to you. my general view, and i think it is supported by how the broader investment community reacted, is that this will provide a better system for companies to go raise capi
wanted to walk away, potentially see another million jobs lost. but we said we've got to try. and now u.s. auto industries are profitable again and hiring again, back on their feet again, on the move again. [applause] there were folks who were wondering whether we could hold the banks accountable for what they had done to taxpayers; or were skeptical about whether we could make infrastructure investments and investments in clean energy and investments in education, and hold ourselves accountable for how that money was spent. there was a lot of skepticism about what we were trying to do. and a lot of it was unpopular. but i want to remind everybody here, you did not elect me to do what was popular. you elected me to do what was right. [applause] that's what we've been fighting together for -- to do what's right. [applause] todon't have our finger out the wind to know what's right. that's why we passed health insurance reform that will make it illegal for insurance companies to deny you coverage because of a preexisting condition. [applause] historic reforms that gives over 30 million ameri
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9